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Youth Community Centre – Message from our Director

By News

Hi, I’m Michelle Procter, the Executive Director at the African Impact Foundation. I’m in Livingstone and wanted to share news from the ground.

It’s hot and dusty, and so far, it’s been an emotional few days. I’ve seen the challenges young people face to get an education and navigate many challenges through their teenage years.

Right now, substance abuse and early pregnancy are big concerns for many parents and teachers, as well as classroom space to learn and do well in exams. Many children only have 3-4 hours at school each day as classrooms are shared throughout the day, so lots of spare time and peer pressure to be influenced into risky behaviours.

It’s been so heart-warming and heartbreaking all at the same time!

What hit me, even more, was the determination and drive of many young people I met to overcome these challenges, especially students on sponsorship programmes. Girls truly want a good education, to build confidence, and to avoid pregnancy so they can become young women with more choices and dreams for their future. The boys I met are driven to finish grade 12, explore career options and learn how to navigate the many challenges that come their way, including substance abuse.

It’s been so heart-warming and heartbreaking all at the same time!

I experienced first-hand how our current workshops help young people make different choices. Our planned Youth Community Centre (formally known as The Girl Impact Centre) will drastically improve these services and give support to thousands of young people and encourage them to work towards a future of prosperity and health. Workshops covering reproductive health, building confidence to make good choices, gender equality, career options, counseling services, and extra tuition will be so valuable.

Recreation spaces and clubs will be important to keep children busy and away from the risks of substance abuse. I visited our plot of land to mark the boundary and discuss the hopes and needs of the Youth Community Centre with our local community advisors. The excitement and need for a youth development space is so real!

I want you to know how transformative your support is for young people here. So many people here in Livingstone thank you from the bottom of their hearts for the opportunities and hope you provide.

Find out more about our Youth Community Centre, here

Disrupt the cycle of poverty with African Impact Foundation 

Memory

Partnering with LETS

By News

The addition of the LETS project to our Girl Impact project will drive the programme to implement a project that will entirely focus on sexual reproductive health rights within our focus communities and targeted groups, where we have already established partnerships.  The overview of the LETS program states that it is a revolutionary education initiative aimed at empowering families in crises worldwide by addressing the universal root cause of poverty and abuse, unplanned and unwanted children born into a household that cannot support them. This is already in line with what has already been implemented on the ground, and the addition of these LETS will be an added advantage to the individuals and the community.

Through the LETS curriculum, we will implement reproductive health and basic health and well-being training to empower women and girls to make more informed choices in these areas. The LETS initiative will introduce workshops solely devoted to sexual reproductive health within our focus communities and targeted groups where we already have partnerships in place.

 

I am convinced that by the end of this programme, I will be able to make more sound decisions on childbearing matters and pass the knowledge to my partner in order to better our living standards as a family.

We are going into our 6th week of LETS with our beneficiaries and there is already a positive impact on participants’ lives.  Participation numbers have risen steadily each passing week, from 6 participants in the first week to 19 participants in the 6th week. This is indicative of progress toward our Gender Equality program. The participants are eager to gain more understanding and information on reproductive health and the tools to prevent unplanned pregnancies.  

 

Memory

Memory shares how the program is impacting her life. 29-year-old Memory grew up in Livingstone and is a dedicated member and participant in the newly introduced LETS program and has also been part of the women’s group programme. 

‘’I had my first child at the age of 17 as a result of early marriage. At the time, I lacked knowledge on so many issues to do with Sexual Reproductive Health and because of this, I had 4 children without the proper child spacing that is required for both mother and child to live a healthy life. Looking after the children has also been financially challenging.

I feel that my life and perspective on Family planning methods have changed greatly ever since I joined the LETS programme, I am now knowledgeable about ways on how to observe changes in my body and monthly cycle in order to prevent unplanned pregnancies. I am also thankful and excited about the fact that the LETS programme is focused on the natural method of family planning because this is a much healthier option for the body. I am convinced that by the end of this programme, I will be able to make more sound decisions on childbearing matters and pass the knowledge to my partner in order to better our living standards as a family. ‘’

Find out more about Girl Impact, here

Disrupt the cycle of poverty with African Impact Foundation 

Training to be a firefighter

By News

“I am very grateful for the opportunity to get an education and thankful for the training I underwent as a firefighter because I have become a much stronger youth and able to withstand the many hardships that life throws at me.  ”

TimothySponsor a Future beneficary

On 16th September 2022, Timothy Graduated with Merit and attained a Certificate in Basic Firefighting in Kabwe, Zambia. He is currently applying for internships in various organizations in order to gain work experience.

Despite the obstacles, Timothy maintained his perseverance and determination to further his education. 

Timothy, 25 years old, was mostly raised by his grandmother in Livingstone and has been on the African Impact Foundation Sponsor a Child program since Grade 6. Timothy has always been determined to perform well academically in order to have a better future and be able to support his family. After completing his Secondary education, Timothy was supported by the Foundation to study Power Electricals, a course offered at the Community Development Centre in Livingstone; however, due to Covid-19 challenges, he could not finish the program.  Despite the obstacles, Timothy maintained his perseverance and determination to further his education. 

By 2021, he realized he was passionate about joining the National Fire Service School to become a trained firefighter. He fought hard to apply for a short training course at the Zambia National Service training school in Kabwe, Zambia. The Foundation sponsored Timothy to buy some of his school requirements and pay for his tuition fees. Through his small clothing business, he managed to contribute towards tuition fees.

Find out more about sponsoring a future, here

Disrupt the cycle of poverty with African Impact Foundation 

Our Work Experience Initiative

By News

“I already applied to two universities in Zambia and now waiting for an acceptance letter. I am very grateful to the African impact Foundation for the support which is a rare privilege.”

Sheila HamuchembaSponsor a Child beneficary

Meet Sheila and Noah, former Sponsor child students that are part of our work experience initiative. In May, Sheila and Noah joined our team in Livingstone, Zambia, and began working on the Youth Insaka programme, working closely with our coordinators and learning all about how our projects are planned, implemented, and run.

Exposure to the world of work opens up more opportunities for young people, helps them build relationships with professionals outside their usual family networks, and it allows them to gain hands-on experience. We developed the work experience initiative to provide opportunities to young people in Livingstone, Zambia. Through our work experience initiative, we are offering Sponsor a Child students who have completed grade 12 a chance to gain work experience.  Students participating in this initiative will gain exposure to the different areas of a non-profit organization by working closely with the African Impact Foundation team in Livingstone.

STORY OF SHEILA

Hardworking, determined,  and ambitious. Sheila Hamuchemba is 18 years old and lives with her parents and 4 siblings. She has been under the ‘Sponsor a Child programme’ from grade 1 to 12 and completed school in 2021. She passed grade 12 with flying colours which made her very happy because she made her parents and sponsor proud. A month after completing grade 12 she was called by the African Impact Foundation to facilitate on Youth Insaka programme.

“It has now been three months of working with the team and I have learnt a lot. For instance, I have perfected my facilitation skills, improved my writing skills, and gained vast knowledge of Sexual Reproductive Health related issues and life skills. I have been groomed into a confident young lady who is able to make sound decisions and choose pathways out of poverty. I really enjoy teaching the children and some of them are even my peers. I look forward to more exciting challenges and experiences. My future aspirations are to study Economics. I already applied to two universities in Zambia and now waiting for an acceptance letter. I am very grateful to the African impact Foundation for the support which is a rare privilege.” Sheila Hamuchemba

STORY OF NOAH

Young and vibrant, with the determination to achieve his dreams, 21-year-old Noah Kalipi has proven to be a hard-working young man who is ready to learn new life skills and break the cycle of poverty in his community. He believes in the value of education as a stepping stone to success.

Noah has been on the Sponsor a Child programme since he was in grade 10 in 2018. Coming from a family of 8 children, Noah lost his father in the year 2017 which left his widowed mother with the challenge of paying for his education until 2018 when he got on the programme.

He completed high school in 2020 with good results and applied at Eden University under Clinical Medicine.  In May 2022, Noah was wholeheartedly accepted to join the work experience placement programme with the foundation as he waited to start studying at university. He was placed under the Youth Insaka programme where he helped with the facilitation of Youth-led discussions in which young people learn about issues related to Education, Health, Wellness, and Gender Equality.

Joseph

Find out more about sponsoring a future, here

Disrupt the cycle of poverty with African Impact Foundation 

Victoria Falls

Here’s What You Need To Know About Livingstone, Zambia

By News

“The people are friendly and welcoming and has more than 70 ethnically diverse people with a cultural blend of values, norms, materials, and spiritual traditions.”

Written by: 

Zebulun Chikoma
Writer from Zambia

Zambia is a landlocked country located in the southern part of Africa and one of the developing countries where poverty, education, unemployment, and diseases are still challenges. It’s blessed with beautiful natural resources and peaceful culture.

Zambia is among the most peaceful countries in Africa. The people are friendly and welcoming and has more than 70 ethnically diverse people with a cultural blend of values, norms, materials, and spiritual traditions. The most spoken languages are English, Tonga, Nyanja, Bemba, Lozi, and Luvale.

There is a special town in Zambia that we are going to look at. It’s one of the most visited places in Zambia because of the beauty and the interesting activities that it offers. Anyone who has been there has a special story to tell. Keep reading to learn more exciting stuff. Livingstone is located in the southern part of Zambia and named after the explorer Dr. David Livingstone. It is one of the biggest cities in Zambia, surrounded by nature and many attractions, especially for tourists.

Victoria Falls

Livingstone is the home of the mighty Victoria Falls and one of the seven wonders of the world. When you arrive, you’ll enjoy the spectacular view of the falls. You’ll surely want this to be part of your tour experience. You can fly over Victoria Falls in a helicopter for the best view or bungee jump from the Victoria Falls Bridge for a fun thrill.

Above the Falls lies the Zambezi River which offers a stunning view of the sunset and wildlife. The river is calm and perfect for refreshing and relaxing. Hop on a Zambezi boat cruise to explore the river, see a variety of animals such as elephants, giraffes, and hippos, and watch the beautiful sunset.

Mosi-oa-Tunya National Park

Mosi-oa-Tunya National Park is a great place for a safari. It might be one of the smallest parks in Zambia, but it sure does have such unique species. Wildlife including white rhinos, elephants, giraffes, buffaloes, waterbucks, impalas, wildebeest, zebra, bushbuck, warthogs, monkeys, baboons, hippos, and crocodiles are found in the park all year-round. It is the only park that has white rhinos in Zambia!

Game Drive

Livingstone Museum

The Livingstone Museum is the oldest yet the most interesting museum in Zambia. Exploring through the five fascinating galleries covering archeology, ethnography, history, art, and the life of David Livingstone is one experience you do not want to miss.

Visit the Local Community

Get the chance to visit a local village and learn about Zambian culture and lifestyle. You’ll gain insight into the local way of life by participating in their daily routines. Participate in enjoyable activities with children from a community school, such as dancing, singing, and playing. For visitors who wish to understand more about the local culture, this is a great chance. You’ll also have the opportunity to tour local community projects and orphanages

Livingstone Tour

When you arrive in Livingstone, the town and community will be there with open arms to welcome you.

African Impact Foundation is on a mission to equip young people with education and skills to move out of poverty. Our holistic approach gives young people in Southern and Eastern Africa the best chance of real, long-term change to break the cycle of poverty for themselves and their community through four pillars: Gender Equality, Education, Wellness and Livelihoods.

During the 12 years of the African Impact Foundation’s impact, we have seen first-hand how youth face specific challenges, as well as have a window of time to make decisions about their future. Because of this, we want to see young people have access to more opportunities and grow skills to create a prosperous life for themselves, their family, and their community.

Come and visit Livingstone to make this experience part of your life. Take part in exciting and fun activities as you tour around. Enjoy the beautiful natural resources as you connect with the peaceful residents and learn more about their culture.

Interested in interning with us? Email us info@africanimpactfoundation.org

Cape Town

My 6 Month Internship with AIF

By News
Internship

“I had wanted to do an internship in which I could learn about all the different roles within an organisation to help me figure out which direction I want to go in the future.”

Rosie DupontTravel Intern

Written by: Rosie Dupont

(NGO Management Travel Intern, 2021)

I completed a 6-month NGO Management internship with the Foundation from June to November 2021. I was really lucky to travel a lot within this time- my first three months were split with a month each in Cape Town, Kruger and Livingstone in Zambia, before I flew back to Cape Town for the last three months. I met a lot of new people, saw a range of projects on the ground, was responsible for a bunch of different tasks, had an insane amount of adventures, and learnt so much about career options, Southern Africa and the Foundation. To say it was a hectic 6 months is an understatement!

I had wanted to do an internship in which I could learn about all the different roles within an organisation to help me figure out which direction I want to go in the future. As I was hopping around to all the locations where the foundation had projects at the time, I was lucky enough to spend some time with everyone in the AIF team. This was super useful to me as I got to experience the responsibilities of each member of staff and learn how everyone works together.

” I mainly worked with the head office but also had the chance to get involved in on-the-ground projects too.”

I completed a lot of different tasks for the foundation, from researching and writing documents on topics such as streamlining communications and microfinance to supporting the onboarding of a new CRM. I had admin tasks such as data management, grant applications, project development planning, project reporting as well as more creative tasks like social media content creation, and the really special opportunity to interview participants and write blogs about their stories (which you should check out if you haven’t already!). I mainly worked with the head office but also had the chance to get involved in on-the-ground projects too. As I spent a decent chunk of time working with the foundation, the team was able to give me more responsibility in my tasks which I am really grateful for!

Although I thoroughly enjoyed my tasks, it wasn’t all work! I had so many amazing experiences, from long days driving around in the Kruger National Park and seeing elephants just outside our gates at breakfast, to visiting the home of a project participant in Limpopo and meeting his family (and chickens!) and visiting a Sangoma in the local village. In Livingstone I chose my own fabric and got a dress tailored for me in a local market and spent a day admiring Victoria falls and sitting in the sun dipping my toes in the Zambezi river. I spent lazy evenings on sunset sarafi cruises with limitless drinks (!) and had an early morning start to go on a horse-back riding safari day. I spent some quality time with my lovely coworkers in Cape Town- from spending an afternoon at a vineyard with Yonela or nights out in town with Sarah and Sash, to a weekend with Michelle and her family or singing at Claudette’s dress-up karaoke party! There were multiple hikes in the beautiful mountains in Cape Town, endless days and sunsets at the beach, swimming with penguins, watching whales at breakfast, motorbiking around wine country… I’m telling you, this continent is something else!

Victoria Falls

But I would say the magic in my experience really simmers down to one thing which sits at the heart of Southern Africa- the braai. After all the travelling, adventures, hard work and long days, you will find any and all people sharing stories, drinks and food around a bonfire. I had braais with coworkers, volunteers, new friends, strangers, locals and travellers, in friends’ gardens, at airbnbs, in the bush, at a hostel… There is always a braai to be had!

Out of all the fun and work and adventures, I think one of the things that stood out most for me over my internship was how amazing my team was. Every single person I met was accommodating, passionate, and keen to work with me. The time I spent there was incredibly meaningful as the team was so flexible and happy to adjust my internship to fit what I wanted to get out of it.

My internship both inspired and humbled me and I’m so grateful for the experience. Sending a massive thank you to African Impact Foundation team and everyone I met along the way!

Find out more about our our internship here

Girl Group

16 Days of Activism

By News
Womens Group Livingstone

“According to UN Women, 46% of Zambian women will experience physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence during their lifetime. However, gender-based violence can also take emotional or financial expressions, none of which are usually highlighted.”

UN WomenUnited Nations

Written by: Franciska Reinholds

(Head Office Virtual Intern, 2021)

Today, December 10, marks the end of this year’s international campaign against gender-based violence. 16 days of activism recognizes that one of the biggest obstacles to achieving gender equality is the daily violence girls and women are facing worldwide. According to UN Women, 46% of Zambian women will experience physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence during their lifetime. However, gender-based violence can also take emotional or financial expressions, none of which are usually highlighted.

The Girl Impact program functions on six pillars. When combined, they become a holistic strategy to fighting gender inequality. At the centre are the girls. Many are initially exposed as a teenager and enter a long and vicious cycle which is often perpetuated by poverty. An important first step to break that cycle is to support girls’ education. Additionally, classes are held to discuss various topics related to their health, such as the issue of early pregnancy. However, sessions also target self-confidence to teach the girls the skill of speaking up for themselves and others.

“By raising awareness about inequalities and questioning gender stereotypes, boys become allies for the cause. “

Another beneficiary of the Girl Impact Program are the women’s groups. Oftentimes women in Zambia have little – if any – resources of their own, financially or socially. Therefore, a heavy focus is on creating income generating opportunities for women. Along the way, sessions also tackle many of the social issues facing their local communities. As a result, the women become resilient leaders, which allows them to be good role models for the girls around them.

The boys are the third and final beneficiary. As brothers, future husbands and fathers, it’s critical to involve them. By raising awareness about inequalities and questioning gender stereotypes, boys become allies for the cause. Through their decision-making, boys – as they grow into young men – can contribute to the safety of girls, both in public and private spaces.

Boys Club

With these six pillars (education, health, early pregnancy, self-confidence, income generation and safety) the Girl Impact Program uplifts girls, boys and women to prevent and address the different forms of gender-based violence. December 10 marks the end of 16 days of activism. But it is also International Human Rights Day. A good reminder that violence against girls and women is not feminist issue, but a human rights issue. As such, we need to fight it collectively.

Find out more about our Girl Impact Program, here

Disrupt the cycle of poverty with African Impact Foundation 

Sponsor a child

Supporting our Sponsor a Child Program

By News
Sponsor a Child

“ We were proud to hear that nearly all the parents noted that SAC has improved their child’s confidence and attitude to school.”

Carol ShikombeloSponsor a Child Coordinator

Written by: Rosie Dupont (Head Office Intern, Cape Town, South Africa, 2021)

Monitoring the impact of the Sponsor a Child (SAC) program is no mean feat. With just under 200 children in 34 different schools in Livingstone, keeping up with all our beneficiaries means our team is very busy. One of our main ways to do this is to visit each school to catch up with all of our students and their teachers to see how they’re doing, both academically and personally.

This helps us support the success of each student as well as keep our sponsors informed on the impact they are making. This process is also useful for us to identify any wider challenges that are impacting multiple students in the program.

Through this process, we had noticed that our students’ attendance since COVID-19 wasn’t as high as it was before the pandemic induced school closures. We recognize that this is an issue being seen around the world. To help combat this issue we decided to host a ‘parent and child event’ to bring students and their families together to address any underlying problems and dig up some motivation.

We held the event at the start of October at a sports complex in the local community. We were pleased to see a turnout with 56 children and 49 parents. After a group discussion led by our SAC Coordinator, Carol, we divided the parents away from the students and walked each group through assessment questionnaires.

“The majority of our students stated that the sponsorship has helped them improve their goals, improve their mental health and gain higher self-esteem.”

At the event we learnt that 85% of our students walk to school, and it takes 70% of our students an hour or more to get to school. Nearly half of the parents acknowledged that this long trek to school affects their child’s academic performance. Although gender equality is something that is a relatively new idea in the local context, the questionnaires highlighted to us that the majority of these parents are encouraging it in their homes through things like chore sharing and encouraging an education for girls.

Positively, all the parents agreed that an education is important for their child, and they will actively encourage and support the completion of school. We were proud to hear that nearly all the parents noted that SAC has improved their child’s confidence and attitude to school. Over 90% of the students themselves told us they feel confident in taking on leadership roles in their school and community. Additionally, the majority of our students stated that the sponsorship has helped them improve their goals, improve their mental health and gain higher self-esteem.

Sponsor a child
Sponsor a child

Overall, the event was successful with the Foundation gaining a better idea of the position of parents in relation to the sponsorships, as well as understanding some of the challenges our students may be facing. We are continuously looking for more ways to interact with the communities we work with and improve the impact of our projects, which we hope you enjoy hearing about as much as we enjoy sharing with you!

Find out more about our sponsor a child, here

Disrupt the cycle of poverty with African Impact Foundation 

Sponsor a Future

Sponsoring a Future

By News
Sponsor a future

“I think I never had enough funds to take myself to school, my parents didn’t have money to take me to school, but this organisation thought of my potential.”

FrancisSponsor a Future beneficary

Written by: Rosie Dupont (Head Office Intern, Cape Town, South Africa, 2021)

In Zambia, only 4% of young people that complete secondary school go on to higher education. In our long standing Sponsor a Child initiative we’re supporting young people through their school years, but with Sponsor a Future, we are now able to expand their opportunities after they finish school.

The other day I was grateful to meet Francis, a previous beneficiary for Sponsor a Child, and now part of the Sponsor a Future project, and sit down with him for a chat about his experiences. Livingstone is where Francis grew up and went to school, but he now resides about 7 hours away in Lusaka, where he is currently studying a degree in Clinical Engineering. Livingstone is the base for the Foundations’ Zambia projects, so it is my home also for the next couple of months. I’m lucky to have caught him- next week he will return to Lusaka to continue his first year of his studies, after the lockdown in Zambia had prevented the university from teaching for a couple of months. Today he’s popped into the Foundation office to show his report cards to the team before he goes back. He shows me the papers with his work, the content of which I have no chance of understanding, but what I do understand is the 85% and 95% scribbled on the top with red marker. He shrugs at my excitement that he’s doing so well, but he smiles at me proudly when I ask to take a picture of him with his scores.

Francis has been supported by the sponsorship program starting in grade 10, as his family were struggling to pay his school fees; “I think I never had enough funds to take myself to school, my parents didn’t have money to take me to school, but this organisation thought of my potential.” His teacher had heard about the program, and after realising Francis’ situation she brought him to the Foundations’ attention. He’s been on the sponsorship all the way through the rest of his secondary school, through college, and now university. About his funding, he says “I have no idea if I could have managed to go to the university without this Foundation, so I think it’s very useful”. Although Francis impressively earned himself a full scholarship for his university fees, the Foundation pays for his accommodation and other fees which makes it possible for him to attend.

“He shrugs at my excitement that he’s doing so well”

It’s not all easy though, Francis explains that he’s not used to this “new kind of online learning” and doing group work at university means sometimes he has to organise travel to meet his group which is tough. Also, for the first time Francis is living away from home, which comes with its own set of challenges – when I ask him about having to cook for himself, he laughs and says, “The first time it was something else, because I didn’t enjoy cooking… but we’re helping each other with my friend”. I ask him what his favourite part of going to university is, and he replies quickly with “watching movies”.

“Watching movies?!” I laugh, confused. I can’t imagine there’s many movies in clinical engineering. He explains, “Sometimes, when I’m done with school stuff, the best thing I can do is watch a movie then going around, because in Lusaka when you start going around off campus, you end up finding a bad situation. When I’m done with assignments then after that I watch movies”. Understanding now, I start to appreciate the mindset Francis has about staying out of trouble to excel in his studies. He’s currently watching a marvel series ‘The Gifted’, which I agree is a great escape.

Despite the challenges, and besides the movies, it’s clear Francis works hard and has chosen his course well, “it has been my dream to do my career, so I’m really enjoying it”. Which is important to him, so he can stay motivated – “my prayer was to go with the things that I like most, so I don’t disappoint the people who are paying for me, I really wanted to go with something that I really like”. He also has big dreams for the future – he wants to work in the medical field and become a doctor, which he thinks he will enjoy as he will be able to help people

Francis has just over three years left of his course in Lusaka, and I have no doubt he’s going to ace it. This year we have many students in Sponsor a Child finishing their secondary education and thinking about what the future holds for them.

Find out more about sponsoring a future, here

Disrupt the cycle of poverty with African Impact Foundation 

Travel intern blog

The Land of Inspiration

By News
Travel Intern, Zambia

“They ran an effective operation and it is so obvious they have their hearts and souls in these projects.”

Ronald TysonTravel Intern (2021)

Written by: Ronald Tyson ( Foundation Travel Intern, Livingstone, Zambia 2021)

Greetings, I’m RON, a recent MBA graduate residing in sunny Tampa Florida. I choose and came to The African Impact Foundation as an NGO Intern in Livingstone, Zambia because it is a field of interest to me. I researched several probable internships to apply for but AF’s almost universal online positive reviews and focused mission statement of educating and developing young people and the community development initiatives is what brought me to their front door.

Working within African Impact and the Foundation I got hands on involvement in community projects such as building schools and sustainable structures like constructing park benches out of plastic waste and bottles. Eco Friendly projects are practiced here.

Our TEAM engaged in several Livingstone Community development initiatives like planting sustainable gardens for nutritionist food, and educational involvement like teaching English literacy in local communities. This was truly a remarkable experience. I was also able to contribute business-level research and analysis on future endeavors.

On the internal operational side, I witnessed firsthand Team building exercises and development, resource allocation and coordination, and the daily impact our team efforts achieved within the communities we served and partnership with.

“We worked together.”.

The leadership and supporting staff are absolutely amazing, and they should be commended for creating a user-friendly environment of hospitality and alliance. We worked together. They ran an effective operation and it is so obvious they have their hearts and souls in these projects. They care about the communities they serve and within days of being around them, I guarantee you will too. We work diligently in the day and have social gatherings in the evening within the team. We play games, sing songs, celebrate our daily efforts, we dine together, laugh out loud, have movie nights, help each other, counsel each other, and by the end of it all, become friends.

Weekends are up for grabs as you are a free agent. This is the opportunity to explore the city. Not as a tourist (there are always touristy things to do) but as a temporary local. Walk the streets of the friendly town, greet and meet people, establish dialect. The natives are super friendly and welcome you open-heartedly. Get invited to churches, greet and meet foreigners now locals who have relocated to the city and set-up their own personal shops and businesses (like the Doctor from INDIA I meet that opened up an 8-building orphanage for young girls). Explore the shops, take in local cuisines, and definitely get to the museums.

After all was said and done, I achieved exactly what I set out to do and I would recommend this internship to anybody. Our base of operation was structured and professional maintained with the heart of GOLD our leaders and supporting staff added to the projects. The Foundations operations are inspiring, meaningful, and add value to all involved. Being on this continent, AFRICA has a reputation of enlightening people. It has both a spiritual and psychological influence on you. Being here builds passion and sympathy in your heart. Creates a drive to reach out, contribute, add value and inspire. Our team concluded that Africa brings out or develops these character traits in individuals who visit the land. As far as we could tell, no other land mass in the world can make this claim.

 I would have stayed longer if the VISA requirements at that time had not required me to depart. But just like THE TERMINATOR, my final words to my new friends were “I’ll be back” and those plans are already in progress.

Find out more and book your travel internship, here

Find our more about our impact, here

Disrupt the cycle of poverty with African Impact Foundation